The HCMC History Museum exhibits for the first time a collection of 221 precious jade objects dating from the 18th century.

Dang Ngoc (The Beauty of Ancient Jade), an exhibition featuring more than 200 ancient jade artifacts, is being held at the HCMC History Museum until November 30.  It is organized to mark the 43rd anniversary of the museum.  Featuring jade from many Asian countries including Vietnam, Japan, Thailand, Laos and especially China, the <a class=exhibition includes two collections of antiques. One collection originally belonged to Victor Thomas Holbé (1857 -1927), a colonial official and a well-known researcher and collector of antiquities. Holbé’s collection once served as the mainstay of the Blanchard de la Brosse Museum, the precursor to the current HCMC History Museum. The other collection comes from the family of Doctor Duong Quynh Hoa, who served as Minister of Health under the Provisional Revolutionary Government of South Vietnam in 1969.” data-natural-h=”907″ data-natural-width=”1360″ src=”https://vcdn-english.vnecdn.net/2022/09/02/1-jpeg-9077-1662125542.jpg”/>

“Dang Ngoc” (The Beauty of Ancient Jade), an exhibition featuring more than 200 ancient jade artifacts, is being held at the HCMC History Museum until Nov. 30. It is organized to mark the 43rd anniversary of the museum. Featuring jade from many Asian countries including Vietnam, Japan, Thailand, Laos and especially China, the exhibition includes two collections of antiques. One collection originally belonged to Victor Thomas Holbé (1857 -1927), a colonial official and a well-known researcher and collector of antiquities. Holbé’s collection once served as the mainstay of the Blanchard de la Brosse Museum, the precursor to the current HCMC History Museum. The other collection comes from the family of Doctor Duong Quynh Hoa, who served as Minister of Health under the Provisional Revolutionary Government of South Vietnam in 1969.

An exposed jade stick. In ancient Chinese and Vietnamese cultures, jade sticks symbolized power and status. According to Hoang Anh Tuan, director of the HCMC History Museum, in Eastern culture, jade symbolizes wealth and power; and ancient jade objects are treasured because of their association with immortality, mystery, and blessing. Jade sticks symbolize power and status. In feudal times, jade sticks belonged to kings and aristocrats and were believed to bring money and good luck to their owners. In Vietnam, under the Nguyen Dynasty, jade sticks were considered the inseparable companions of crown princes. Jade sticks often have a curvy shape and various flower or animal designs such as orchids to symbolize integrity and nobility, and deer and cranes to indicate happiness and longevity.

Jade belt clips, a symbol of wealth, originated in ancient China and were in vogue from around 770 to 476 BCE.  Tuan said that with the current exhibition, which was held online last year, the museum hopes to help people better understand the ancient art and techniques of making jade objects, and to learn to value this cultural heritage.  The exhibition, which opened on Tuesday and will last until November 30, features six categories of objects: ceremonial seed holders;  altar articles;  classic office quadruples (brushes, ink, brush holder or ink and paper holder);  screens;  objects of power (jade sticks and archers' rings), and others (various objects including seals and bracelets).

Jade belt clips, a symbol of wealth, originated in ancient China and were in vogue from around 770 to 476 BCE. Tuan said that with the current exhibition, which was held online last year, the museum hopes to help people better understand the ancient art and techniques of making jade objects, and to learn to value this cultural heritage. The exhibition, which opened on Tuesday and will last until November 30, features six categories of objects: ceremonial seed holders; altar articles; classic office quadruples (brushes, ink, brush holder or ink and paper holder); screens; objects of power (jade sticks and archers’ rings), and others (various objects including seals and bracelets).

Associated with ancient Chinese archers, archer rings later became an emblem of the ruling class.  In ancient China, archers' rings were worn on the thumb of the hand pulling the string.  In addition to protecting that finger, an archer's ring was also thought to help the archer aim accurately, even when riding a horse at a run.  In ancient China, archers' rings were worn on the thumb of the hand pulling the string.  In addition to protecting that finger, an archer's ring was also thought to help the archer aim accurately, even when riding a horse at a run.

Associated with ancient Chinese archers, archer rings later became an emblem of the ruling class. In ancient China, archers’ rings were worn on the thumb of the hand pulling the string. In addition to protecting that finger, an archer’s ring was also thought to help the archer aim accurately, even when riding a horse at a run. In ancient China, archers’ rings were worn on the thumb of the hand pulling the string. Towards the end of the 18e century, under the Qing dynasty, archery lost its vogue and archers’ rings gradually became objects of adornment and the emblem of the powerful.

A ceremonial grain holder with both handles featuring dragon engravings.  For their part, the ceremonial grain carriers on display also feature various and intricate dragon postures and other patterns that signify different cultural periods in Chinese history.

A ceremonial grain holder with both handles featuring dragon engravings. For their part, the ceremonial grain carriers on display also feature various and intricate dragon postures and other patterns that signify different cultural periods in Chinese history.

An antique screen used for both feng shui and home decor.  The screens, designed to block wind and sunlight, were made of different materials such as jade, porcelain enamel, brick or wood.  They also catered to feng shui needs.  Jade screens were often engraved with characters from ancient Chinese stories, Han calligraphy, or Buddhist prayers, then polished to show the natural veins or lines embedded in the jade.

An antique screen used for both feng shui and home decor. The screens, designed to block wind and sunlight, were made of different materials such as jade, porcelain enamel, brick or wood. They also catered to feng shui needs. Jade screens were often engraved with characters from ancient Chinese stories, Han calligraphy, or Buddhist prayers, then polished to show the natural veins or lines embedded in the jade.

Classic brush holders often engraved with images of dragons or grasses.

Classic brush holders often engraved with images of dragons or grasses.

Jade bangles.

Jade bangles.

The jade fairy statuettes reflect a high level of sculptural techniques.

The jade fairy statuettes reflect a high level of sculptural techniques.

Hoang Anh Tuan (in blue), director of the HCMC History Museum, introduces the exhibits to the guests.

Hoang Anh Tuan (in blue), director of the HCMC History Museum, introduces the exhibits to the guests.


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