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Hunter’s quilts are colored not only out of creativity, but also out of need, he said.

“Every piece of fabric you see on this show has been reused,” Carfagno said. “Mainly family clothes or clothes and fabrics from neighbors in the community. “

Three quilts hang loosely in the center of the gallery, allowing visitors to view their stand, often made from reused sacks of sugar, wheat and flour. Discolored labels still remain on part of the fabric.

Hunter was known for her hard work, and it shows in her quilts, Carfagno said. “One of the things you will learn from the exhibit is that she was a leader and that she is an inspiring story as she approached the world with the vitality and vigor that was reflected in everything that she did. ‘she did, “he said.

The exhibit tells visitors about Hunter’s creative process with an emphasis on his improvisation. She created the quilts on the fly, much like improvisational jazz, Carfagno said.

The quilting style was one of the reasons the museum got the exhibit, he said. “We love her because she breaks the rules… and as an institution we’ve tried to redefine what an art museum can be and she’s the type of personality we admire because of her energy. , his willingness to do things differently, his willingness to take risks, ”said Carfagno.


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